Web literacies? (v0.2 beta)

Web literacies? (v0.2 beta)

In the run-up to me starting full time with the Mozilla Foundation I’ve been continuing my thinking on web literacies.

The above diagram is based upon the excellent work of Michelle Levesque, my diagramming of her work, and some subsequent post-it notes.

I’m thinking out loud here.

Things that have changed since the last version:

  • Move from ‘web literacy’ to ‘web literacies’
  • Themes (exploring, connecting, building, protecting) organised hierarchically
  • Removal of ‘calling APIs’, ‘manipulating data’ and so on
  • Update: The colours no longer mean anything (thanks @PatParslow!)

I realise that the last of these could be contentious. The reason I’ve removed these more technical aspects has nothing to do with whether I think they’re important. Of course they are.

It’s just that if you start from the endpoint of describing someone who’s ‘web literate’ I think it’s entirely possible not to be able to ‘call an API’ yet still be web literate.

What do you think?

I’d really appreciate some feedback – this is still very early work! 🙂

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How to focus in the age of distraction. [GRAPHIC]

How to focus in the age of distraction

(click on image for larger version hosted on author’s website)

I came across the above diagram on Google+ recently. Having not posted much about productivity recently, I thought this was the perfect opportunity to share something I’ve found really helpful.

What I like about this is that it’s colourful, immediately obvious, and includes some stellar advice! 🙂

The author, Sharon Genovese of Learning Fundamentals, asks for a donation if you’d like to use any of her (awesome) mindmaps.

Reconfiguring Mozilla’s Web Literacies (v0.1 alpha)

Reconfiguring Mozilla's web literacies using post-its

Click image to enlarge!

I’ve been thinking about web literacy (or web literacies) on and off since I posted a diagram version of Michelle Levesque’s helpful first efforts.

The post-it note arrangement above is the result of a burst of creativity following a migraine earlier. The structure was prompted by some things mentioned by Helen Beetham at a couple of JISC events earlier this week.

I’d love some feedback!

Why the REMIX is at the heart of digital literacies

The Essential Elements - Remix

 

Since completing my doctoral thesis on digital and new literacies, I’ve been thinking a lot about how educators can use my work in a practical way.

In Chapter 9 of my thesis I come up with eight ‘essential elements’ of digital literacies, abstracted from the literature. I’ve presented these in various forms, my most popular slidedeck being available here.

After seeing me present on these essential elements, people tend to ask me one or both of the following questions:

  1. Which is the most important element to focus upon?
  2. How can I develop these in practice?

I’m helping with the second question through my iterative e-book, The Essential Elements of Digital Literacies, which I’ve just started (and you can buy into). The first question, however, about relative importance and focus has been bugging me.

On the one hand, I want to say that all of the elements are equally important – but that the relative priority that should be given to each will depend upon context. That’s true, but it feels like a bit of a cop-out.

So, after spending some time visualising Mozilla’s first attempts at defining web literacy, I think I’ve hit upon an organising concept: the remix.

Literacy is all about reading and writing. If we take ‘reading’ and ‘writing’ metaphorically (as we must when moving into the digital realm) then these become, loosely, understanding and processing and creating and applying.

This sounds a lot to me like remixing.

I’m going to be thinking about this further. It will form a central theme to my e-book, and I’ll be using it as an organising concept for my TEDx Warwick talk in March. 🙂

Trajectories of ambiguity: my first journal article.

In a move that will no doubt shock known world, I’ve decided that first-ever journal article will be both a collaborative venture and cock a snook towards traditional subject disciplines. Provisionally entitled Seven types of ambiguity and digital literacy I’m co-authoring it with my Ed.D. thesis supervisor Steve Higgins. Allegations that I’m doing so to prove originality in my research ahead of my viva voce by producing an article from an intended thesis chapter are, of course, completely unfounded.

Ambiguous terms and phases of ambiguity

I’m not going to give an overview of the entire article (for obvious reasons) although it will be published in an open-access journal. Suffice to say that we’re introducing the idea that terms such as digital literacy and digital natives/immigrants exhibit a ‘trajectory of ambiguity’ through which they pass on the way to becoming what Richard Rorty calls ‘dead metaphors’.

To prevent you having to go back and do Philosophy and Linguistics 101 I’ll remind you that the denotative aspect of a term is its surface or primary meaning. The connotative aspect of a term is its secondary, or implied, meaning. In the article, which features the overlapping diagram above (I’m not allowed to call it ‘Venn’, apparently) we’re arguing that there are three distinct phases through which terms pass. Whilst they never completely shed their connotative aspect the edge to the right of ‘Productive ambiguity’ is where the dictionary definition of terms reside. Generative ambiguity tends to be ‘blue skies thinking’, Creative ambiguity discussing and debating the definition of a term, and Productive ambiguity putting it into practice in various contexts.

You’ll be delighted to learn that we’ve done a sterling job in making the article itself ambiguous, situating it in the phase of Creative ambiguity. “Be the change you want to see,” “walk the walk,” etc.

Web apps and workflows

The JISC infoNet team of which I am part are presenting at the Support Northumbria conference next month. We’re presenting a smorgasbord of delights for delegates with my part focusing upon workflows.

We’ve done plenty of work as a team on mapping our workflows but, given the fast-paced world we work in, I’ve not thought through mine as a researcher for a while. I decided to break out the crayons this afternoon, therefore, and think through both what I’m currently doing and how I can make that process more effective.

The first thing I did was to create four columns, reflecting what I consider to be the stages of research I go through:

  1. Inputs
  2. Lenses
  3. Curation
  4. Synthesis

Once I’d done that I placed every web app I use regularly into one of the columns (or ‘other’) and then identified which are core to my productivity. Then I thought how they fit together and how I could hone my workflow. I came up with this:

The grey river thing to the left stands for sources of information whilst the one in the middle for projects (current and potential).

I’ll no doubt have missed out something huge, but it was an interesting process to go through. I realised, for example, that I need to pay for Evernote on a yearly basis (I’ve been paying on an ad-hoc monthly basis) and use it more consistently. Also, I hadn’t carried out the very simple step of auto-feeding my Amplify RSS into Licorize as I had done with my starred twitter items!